Centrul Astra Film

 

 

Astra Film Festival

Film catalogue

0-9 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

  • A Little Bit About Ana

    The film makes a journey across Ana's life. Ana is in quest of falling in love, of having the best possible friends, of finding herself, and of being accepted by others. It is a journey through the dark. A documentary about trafficked women in Romania, one among many tragic issues in post-communist Romania. ...

  • A Bar at the Victoria Station

    Marek and Piotrek are two friends in their late twenties. They live in Poland, and the prospect of turning thirty, without having a job, forces them to make critical decisions. After exhausting all possibilities to find jobs in their hometown, they turn their hopes towards England. Other people, even some of their friends have made it there, so why shouldn't they give it a try? Their dream is to open a bar at the Victoria station. This goal may be rather hard to attain, especially as neither of them speaks any English. After many efforts, they eventually arrive in London. What they find, however, is far from what they had expected. The two friends soon find themselves easy prey for the local racketeers. They even fall victim to their more experienced compatriots, who have lived in London for some years. The film explores, in an observational manner, the status of immigrants from former communist Western European countries. ...

  • A Blooming Business

    a BLOOMING BUSINESS is a poetic documentary by TON van ZANTVOORT about people in Kenya who feel imprisoned by the power of the global flower industry. The dilemmas of the industry grow painfully clear and there is only one conclusion possible: the smell of the imported rose is not sweet, but bitter. The film combines pure observation with direct comments of the main characters. The camera is absent and present at the same time. With great humanism, Van Zantvoort shows us a different world where all human life is valuable. ...

  • A Fancy House

    Sibiu, Romania, is getting a new EU look. Everything must be gleaming. "Waiting for the EU." Debates, disclosures and an old vaccum cleaner. Sibiu is one of the richest cities in Romania and European Capital of Culture 2007. In the middle of all this is 70-years-old Ioan Drasovean, an old man trying to keep up with the drastic changes in his country. We follow Ioan in his everyday life: at home or sitting on a bench in the park: in serious discussions with his friend Ilie or with others, discussing Putin, Castro and mobile phone charges. And there is an old vaccum cleaner that needs to be fixed. "We are waiting for the EU." This is a film about Romanian society, its problems and hopes. And about how communism gave up because it was clever. ...

  • A Ferry Tale

    A ferry travel through the Victoria harbor, witness different changes of the city, also witness the last moment of the clock tower. ...

  • A Few Things About Queen Marie

    "I was barely seventeen when I came to you. I was young and ignorant, but very proud of my native country, and even now, I am proud to have been born an Englishwoman... but I bless you, dear Romania, country of my joy and my grief, the beautiful country which has lived in my heart" (Queen Marie of Romania). The film is conceived as a personal account. Fragments of the Queen's biography are interpreted by the acclaimed actress Maia Morgenstern, whose profile is projected on a background of archive footage and photographs. ...

  • A Godforsaken Place

    A community of over 1,800 gypsyes live in the outskirts of the small town Bocşa, not far from Timişoara. They do not speack the gypsy language anymore, these people have lost their ethnic identity. There are many children in the community, adults are unemployed and everybody is struggling to survive from day on nettles, wild fruit and mushrooms they can find in the forrest. ...

  • A Kalahary Family: part 2 End of the Road

    In 1978, after a twenty year separation, John Marshall is reunited with Toma and !U's family. Like a majority of Ju/'hoansi, they have settled at Tsumkwe, an administrative post established by the South Africans who govern the territory of South West Africa. They came in search for water, employment and what they hoped would be an easier life. But in Tsumkwe, Ju/'hoansi survive on corn meal rations, while the few with money and jobs buy liquor. Drunkenness, violence and the diseases of poverty are rampant and painfully depicted in END OF THE ROAD. The new life also creates inequalities that the Ju/'hoansi never experienced. When the South African Defence Force begins recruiting Ju/'hoansi and paying the large salaries to fight the liberation forces of the South West African People's Organisation, called SWAPO, these disparities become chasms. Marshall and his colleague Claire Ritchie record the decline in the Ju/'hoan society in 1980-81 when Tsumkwe becomes known as “the place of death”. Hoping to re-establish a more stable way of life, the Ju/'hoansi start working with a development foundation founded by Marshall's father. The foundation assists them to begin farming and in 1981, Toma's family leaves Tsumkwe, heading back to their traditional waterhole at Gautcha with axes, shovels and cattle. End of The Road is the second part of the five-part series A Kalahari Family. ...

  • A Kalahary Family: part 3 The Real Water

    Throughout 1983 Ju/'hoan movement out to Tsumkwe gains momentum. Three farming communities are established and the people are busy milking and managing their cattle. However, the fledgling communities face a new threat. The department of Nature Conservation is planning to establish a game reserve on Ju/'hoan land where people will be forbidden to have livestock or plant crops. They will be encouraged to act like “Bushmen” - dress in skins, gather bush-foods, and hunt for the amusement of tourists. REAL WATER documents a decade of grassroot efforts by the Ju/'hoansi to stake a claim to their traditional lands. As conflict intensifies, John Marshall and the people decide to drill their own boreholes. With more water the reason people can establish more farms and strengthen their claim. Meanwhile, International pressure for South Africa to leave South West Africa escalates. Better relations between Ju/'hoansi and the government become possible. Tsamko, Toma's son leads a delegation to the capitol with a petition protesting the game reserve. Finally, the department of Nature Conservation announces that instead of game reserve, it will promote trophy hunting, definitely the lesser of two evils. Looking forward to a more democratic future, delegates from the farming communities meet for the first all - Ju/'hoansi convention to write down the laws by which they hope to govern their land. ...

  • A Kalahary Family: part 4 Standing Tall

    In 1989, after twelve decades of colonial rule, South West Africa is about to become independent Namibia. Twenty-eight Ju/'hoan farming communities have been established, but the people's legal claim to their traditional lands in Nyae Nyae remains in question. STANDING TALL documents the efforts of members of the Ju/'hoan farmers' co-op to find their relatives in white ranching districts and black ethnic homelands and help them return to Nyae Nyae and farm. The film depicts the desperate lives of the dispossessed Bushmen-poor, hungry, exploited - among whom the co-op members meet /Qui Chapman. /Qui, a highly skilled Ju/'hoan farmer, works for a white rancher and earns 120 Rand ($80 US) a month. Forced to buy his family needs from the rancher's store, essencially /Qui works for cornmeal. Political activity heats up as independence approaches. South West African People's Organization, or SWAPO, the Ju/`hoansi believe are most likely to support Ju/`hoan farming and they celebrate SWAPo's victory in the 1991 UN-sponsored national election. UN troops help relocate /Qui Chapman's family to a barehole in Nyae Nyae. With little more than a pump and few tools /Qui dances for joy as his family looks forward finally to farming their own land. ...

  • A Kalahary Family: part 5 Death by Myth

    By 1992, Namibian independence is attracting unprecedented levels of international aid for the Ju/'hoansi, but people complain that the development foundation no longer services theirs farms. DEATH BY MYTH documents the shift in policy from farming to wildlife management and cultural tourism. As John Marshall and the Ju/'hoansi attempt to rally support for farming, we witness the power of the "Bushman myth". This myth - a belief that Ju/'hoansi are born to hunt and uniquely capable of living in harmony with nature - denies Ju/'hoansi the humanity to change their economy and survive on their own. Ju/'hoansi endure their cattle being killed by lions and their water pumps destroyed by elephants. In 1994, Ju/'hoansi vote unanimously to dismiss the directors of the foundation, but their actions do little to stop natural resources development or the money pouring in to implement it. In 1996, with promises of great wealth, Ju/'hoansi vote to establish a nature conservancy. What did they really understand about the policy they were endorsing? The film ends in the year 2000 when the Ju/'hoansi conservancy members receive a meager 75 Namibian dollars (approximately $ 10.50 US) each - their profit from two years of trophy hunting. As more farms fail, many people are forced to return to the squalor and disease of Tsumkwe. ...

  • A Kitchen For The People

    In ‘the world’s happiest country’ – Denmark, food waste is one of the biggest paradoxes causing social, environmental and moral issues. Very often supermarkets, restaurants and even independent farmers throw out food that is still perfectly edible, transforming the dumpsters into treasure chests for many curious. Folkekøkken – A Kitchen for the People depicts a group of young people, mainly international students who have created and maintained a weekly free, volunteer-based restaurant by collaborating with two farmers and a bakery that chose to donate their waste instead of throwing it away. The film captures the ephemeral community that is formed each week due to an ever-changing flow of participants, and reflects on the underlying values these people share. ...

  • A LETTER TO DAD

    "Hey Dad, you died suddenly." The filmmaker, trying to make sense of the way his father chose to die, opens several boxes, all that is left behind. The forgotten photos, letters and home videos take the film back to Yugoslavia in the 70s', when his parents became lovers. But the journey through the years, to family members, lost friends and places, reveals the lingering horrors of the recent Balkan wars still tearing people and families apart. A film that, in the most immediate way, questions the individual responsibility of ordinary people caught in the winds of war. ...

  • A Mere Breath

    Dobrin Sicrea lives with his wife and their children in Copșa Mică, the most polluted town in Europe until 2009, when the Sometra factory he was working for closed down. Denisa, the youngest daughter, is semiparalized and her parents lead a devoutly religious life. Monica Lăzurean-Gorgan captures – through fixed shots and shot compositions reminiscent of Ulrich Seidl’s stylistics – 7 years from the life of this family, offering viewers the chance of observing over time a nuanced family relations dynamics. Some things change as the children grow up, while others seem to remain the same. A MERE BREATH explores with maturity and empathy the moral dillemas that Dobrin faces, after having arrived more than once at the crossroads between medicine and religion. Not unlike Ionas’s biblical parable, this family’s faith seems to be tested as well, while waiting for a miracle to happen. ...

  • A Minister Backtracks

    A Danish minister decides to give up her comfortable office and start a private pursuit of a war criminal from Bosnia. As the Minister for Refugees she had witnessed the exhuming of bodies from a mass grave in Bosnia in 1996. Haunted by these images, she decides to expose the massacre that had forced so many people to seek refuge in Western Europe. Her investigation reveals that the massacre was lead by the local school principal. In the summer of 1999, the Minister began an intense pursuit through former Yugoslavia for this man whose name is on the War Crimes Tribunal's secret list of war criminals. A camera team followed her journey, and captured the moment when, after fourteen days of search, she suddenly stood face to face with the man who had inflicted so much pain on so many people. She had been chasing the essence of evil, but when she met up with her nemesis, he turned out to be merely another politician. ...

  • A Month in the Life of Ephtim D.

    Ephtim D., 73 years old, a retired postman, lives in Sofia with his wife in a three-room suburban apartment. As a socialist, he feels confused by the "crazy" democracy and the uncertainties of the transition period. The couple's combined pensions amount to 66$. Ephtim experiences constant difficulties in balancing the family budget. Free medical care and lunches at a subsidized canteen are essential to his survival strategy. This portrait of a Bulgarian pensioner is presented in the context of a global hopelessness and a clearly felt nostalgia for the communist past. ...

  • A Shepherder's Homecoming

    Mexican migrant worker Thomas Ballato, lives his job on a Nevada sheepranch after shearing, lambing and trailing his 2000 head flock to summer pasture and returns to his family in the steel industry town of Lazaro Cardenas. Michoacan, to recapture his years "lost" on the other side, that is in the USA. ...

  • A spoon's tale

    The film presents one of the oldest trades of the Romany, practiced nowadays only by the elderly members of the community: wood carving. Moreover, the documentary tells the story of the times when "the earth was ploughed with two fingers" and the Gypsies did not have to face the social realities of the current days. The story goes on about the identity of the rudari, a Romany group who believe they are descendents from the Dacians and do not like to be considered Gypsies. ...

  • A Story from Home

    The story imagined by the children is simple, but it tells a lot of things about how they see the world of grownups: The Bride and Ruki-the-alien are planning to get married, but Gogobela, the negative character, tries to break them up. The Bride’s friends help her find out the truth. Like in the fairy tales, things end well and Gogobela is eaten by Bali-the-Whale. Eventually, The Bride and Ruki get married and promise to each other that „they will never lose their head”. ...

  • A Story of An Old Castle

    In a canyon of Liangshan Nationality Autonomous Region, there is an old castle whose declining walls have witnessed, like an old person, the changes of history. It keeps together the 30 households of the Han and the Yi people. The hostile nature and the everyday problems of life require collaboration and solidarity among the inhabitants. Generation after generation have been farming herding and living here. What are these people’s ambitions and dreams like? This film wants to spy out the forgotten corners of life and tell a common yet thrilling story. RO: In Regiunea Autonoma Liangshan se înalta, într-un canion un vechi castel. Zidurile sale surpate au fost martore ale schimbarilor istorice de aici, aidoma unui om batrân. Acum, ele adapostesc 30 gospodarii ale unor familii din nationalitatile Han si Yi. Natura ostila si problemele de fiecare zi îi obliga pe locuitori la colaborare si solidaritate. Generatii dupa generatii, ei au trait aici si si-au crescut turmele. Care le sunt visele si nazuintele? Filmul doreste sa spioneze colturile cele mai ascunse ale vietii acestor oameni si sa spuna o poveste obisnuita, dar tulburatoare. ...

  • A Student Village

    High on the Hengduan Mountain Range, in the western part of the Yunnan Province, there is a school village unknown and inaccessible to outsiders. The place is called Tian Deng, and it is the location of the only school in an area of over 160 square km of steep mountains terrain and abrupt roads. Thus, it is impossible for the children living in the region to go back and forth to school, so they must live in Tian Deng permanently. Since the school cannot afford to build dorms and a canteen for its students, their parents have made small wooden cabins around the school. In time, eighty such cabins crowded the area. These cabins are home for more than 300 children between six and fourteen years of age. After classes, they have to run their little households to make a fire, cook, wash clothes, and fetch water. No matter how young they are, they have to take care of themselves. From the day they arrive in the students' village, they are invested with the responsibilities of adults. ...

  • A Tale of Two Villages; Modernization and De-modernization of the Romanian Village

    The film looks at the extremes of communist interference in the lives of the inhabitants of two rural villages in Romania. In fifty years of totalitarian regime, rural society underwent dramatic changes. The film examines Nucsoara, a mountain village, whose inhabitants opposed the communist regime, and Scornicesti, a village in the plain, which was used as the emblem of collectivization. Nucsoara remained one of the few isles of private property in communist Romania in spite of the fact that many of the inhabitants were arrested, tortured and even executed due to their resistance. By comparison, those in Scornicesti, Ceausescu's birthplace, were subjected to absurd experiments of social engineering. The two villages are representative of the destiny of rural society in Romania. Do authentic peasants still exist? What is their life like in the aftermath of communism? This film follows the story of the two villages since 1946, in search of answers to these questions. ...

  • A Village Romance

    The village was once settled by a community of lesbians seeking refuge from the city. Only a few families have remained. One of them lives in poverty but in a valuable house. The mistress of the house falls in love with her unfortunate, gypsy neighbor lady, M. Despite the fact that M is heterosexual, alcoholic, beaten regularly by her husband, threatened to have her children taken from her, and scorned by the villagers because of her gypsy descent, she reciprocates her neighbor's affection. "No one's ever loved me for who I am," she says. She can hardly wait for her husband to leave so she can take her three children and move in with the woman she loves. ...

  • Abdul & Hamza

    With an understated approach to the subject of Somali refugees traveling the roads of Europe in search of safety and a better life, “Abdul & Hamza” is a documentary sensitive to the significance of passing moments and the past’s repetitive patterns. Undermining our expectations through a series of “fake endings” signalled through music or mood, the film unravels the trappings of a history which reiterates itself, leaving the two protagonists in between states and spaces, on a road that never ends. Reacting to his two characters instead of exploiting their stories to appeal to the public, director Marko Grba Singh chooses long takes connected by voices leaking from one scene into another and frames favouring space to defuse the subject’s inherent dramatism. This makes for a more human approach to Abdul an Hamza whose discreet presences will literally fade, invisible as they are to the collective consciousness. ...

  • About Iulian Mihu, As He Was; About Us, The Way We Are

    Iulian Mihu, departed from amongst us for 10 years now, is a great personality of Romanian cinema. His films talk could probably say most about their creator. In spite of that, the makers of this documentary, due to the lack of hard evidence preserving Mihu’s memory, wished that he be remembered through the testimonies of some of his colleagues and friends. Violeta Andrei, Irina Petrescu, Sergiu Nicolaescu, Julieta Szonyi, Liliana Tudor Iorgulescu, Radu Boruzescu, assistant director Adriana Lupu and editor Gabriela Nasta are only some of the names of those who, each in their own manner, contributed their memories to the making of this film. Thus we catch a glimpse of a director who was able to defy rules and orders. The film-makers try, in this movie, to act a little bit like him - sincere and unconventional. He had an enigmatic persona - sometimes furious, sometimes gentle and his motto could have been “we film to have fun”. He was an artist who, despite his career ups and downs, scandals and great movie, will always be remembered for his free spirit and the fact that he was always, until the very end, true to himself. ...

  • About love: Ira

    This is the story of a young woman, Ira, who lives like all of us between love and dislike, with quarrels, routine, unrealized dreams and hope for the best. But first of all, this story is about love, love for the difficult and crazy life, about love, that is nothing like the love in the Bible and the idealistic sense which the word often conveys. The film is about love, destiny, life … About all of us. ...

  • Absent

    For over a hundred years, Mărculeşti was a vibrant Jewish agricultural and mercantile community in Bessarabia (now present-day Moldova). In July 1941, the village was the site of an unimaginable atrocity. Seventy-four years later, few speak honestly or completely about what happened. ABSENT is a cinematic portrait of the ghost village of Mărculeşti, its current inhabitants, and their very complex relationship to their own history. Working entirely on location, filmmaker Matthew Mishory documents one of Europe's poorest, most remote, and least-visited places. A Romania-Switzerland-US Co-Production. ...

  • Across the Line

    Across the Line is an immersive virtual reality experience that combines 360°video and computer generated imaging (CGI) to put viewers in the shoes of a patient entering a health center for a safe and legal abortion. Using real audio gathered at protests, scripted scenes, and documentary footage, the film is a powerful hybrid documentary fiction depiction of the gantlet that many abortion providers, health center staff, and patients must walk on a typical day in America. ...

  • ACTING BETWIXT AND BETWEEN

    How could one imagine the GDR without having experienced it personally? Being born one year before the Fall of the Wall the director ties in with the past of her parents in her native town, Halle. Although this period belongs to the past, the life of its inhabitants is still impregnated, despite all their efforts, with the division of the post-war German society and its consequences. Contradictions emerge, one of them being between the nostalgia of a bygone era and the joy of the liberty attained after 1989. The film shows the battle of a children's theatre in danger of extinction. ...

  • Adakale Stories

    The amazing and thought provoking story of the tiny island of Adakale, which was known as a fairy land in the River Danube until it sank in the waters of a dam in 1970… Being the source of the most striking experiences of the Turks that may be traced in Europe and along the River Danube until our times, Adakale is being translated into the language of cinema for the first time, being aware of all sources. The documentary named "Adakale Stories" tries to connect the divided memories of the islanders who were dissolved in the lands of Turkey and Romania with their roots through their memories, albums, souvenirs, and dreams. The documentary films in disarranged archives, and accessories, maps, litographs in museums of the Adakale people who were scattered away turn into the sour taste of an incurable homesickness. ...

  • Adam and Eve

    The film is shot in a remote Romanian mountain village. Here, the men, like biblical Adam, work hard in the field day after day. The women, like Eve, keep the house and have many children. Based on interviews, the film tells stories of the past and talks about hardships of the present. It alternates between splendid mountain scenery and moments in the daily life of the villagers. The filmmaker differentiates between the roles of men and women in village life. While men are observed working in the field, women are filmed in the setting of their homes, where they spend the largest part of their lives. This is a film with touching stories about people living in a dying rural world. ...

  • Adela

    It is Adela’s 80th birthday. A former radio personality, she lives on her own in the slums of Manila, surrounded by a sea of humanity, their problems, successes, and trivialities. She is swept up in the mundane and dramatic events of those around her. Adela is about the quiet moments in life that can fill us with either joy or sorrow. ...

  • Adela and Agnetha

    Adela is a Gypsy married to a Saxon from Transylvania, while Agnetha is a Saxon married to a Gypsy. They live in the same village, Mergideal, are mothers to many children and life doesn’t go easy on them. When asked “How did you meet?” they answer plainly, “It was love.” In Transylvania, there are hundreds such families, spread in the areas where Saxons used to live. The documentary film maker tells of how he went into the Transylvanian Plateau looking for Roma and Saxon mixed families. He was interested in these minorities, opposite both in origin and culture. The Gypsies remember the times when they came about and there were many Saxons and only a few Gypsy. Now it is different. What do the two ethnic groups have in common and what differentiate them? What do they learn from each other? A close look on interculturalism in Transylvania. ...

  • AFF 2015 Official Opening - Double Bind Theatre Performance

    Double bind Double Bind is a documentary-theatre show, a result of a drama workshop involving Romanian and Hungarian actors, who went through a creative process based on their own personal experience, letting the feelings and hidden thoughts of both communities loose. Alina Nelega, a drama author involved with underground theatre, and Kincses Réka, a film director, share the pleasure of forcing taboos and tackling themes people are afraid of and prefer to keep silent about. Their common endeavor gave birth to a show that makes use of documentary film technique: it does not fabricate anything, but captures slices of reality. ...

  • After the Revolution

    This is a film about what happened just after Romania's bloody 1989 revolution. Set in the streets of central Bucharest and filmed in the observational cinema style, After the Revolution follows the furious debates that were taking place on the streets at the time and observes the struggle for power between Ion Iliescu, a former Communist leader who assumed power immediately after Nicolae Ceausescu was deposed, and Ion Ratiu who had spent most of his life living in exile in London. ...

  • AFTER THE SILENCE WHAT REMAINS UNSAID DOES NOT EXIST?

    After the Silence... deals with how the effects of dictatorship are still extremely vivid, even after the fall of dictatorship. It is a film about the abuses of the state, about fear, how silence is passed on from one generation to the next. A film about the space which, despite all that is known, is left to ghosts that make it impossible to live fully in the present. Three generations walled in silence. The legacy of denial, as nothing has been put back in its place and nothing has been said. Killing the dictator is not enough to kill the dictatorship. ...

  • After the War

    South-Western Serbia, an isolated area, whose inhabitants are the former "guardians" of the country, defenders of the Serbian orthodoxy. Since abandoned by Belgrade, they are becoming angry – more and more – with everyone. With Albanians who, in their opinion, are responsible for the war, and with Serbs who thoroughly forgot them… A small zone outside the history and, nowadays, even outside the world. ...

  • Agadez nomade FM

    Radio Nomad FM is a local radio station serving the Nigerian desert city of Agadez, and some 50 km beyond. The station broadcasts cultural and educational programs and news. Quite popular with the locals, it has some influence on people. Contrary to the title, the main focus of the film is not the radio station, but the people and their stories. Agadez used to be a major trade center. Blacks, Tuaregs, nomads and sedentaries, Muslims and animists have always lived together more or less peacefully. The result is an open-minded city, and a self-conscious community. In Agadez, there is competition between conservatism and adaptation. There is tradition and there is change. The film explores people's concerns related to social change, the role of women, religion, tradition and their relation to the modern world. The authors share with the viewer their personal experience in the process of getting to know the people of Agadez: "They seemed complete strangers to us at first, and then we found them to be quite close to us, having the same concerns as ourselves and our neighbours back home. Only the social rules are different." ...

  • Against Blood Justice

    In 1991 LuceOs son was murdered in Albania. Exploring the turmoil the country went through along with the personal and spiritual experience of this woman who chose to forgive the man who murdered her son, thus following the OBesaÓ specified in Lek DukagjinOs Kanun, we will move along the historical, religious and social path of todayOs Albania. Today the OforgivenÓ sees Luce as a OmotherÓ: thanks to her he has been totally rehabilitated in the eyes of societyÉ Luce has now become a peace mediator to help other families involved in a process of Oblood justiceÓ. ...

  • Age

    “Everyone wants to grow old, but no one wants to be old”. AGE, an anthropological and kaleidoscopic essay, questions how our perspective on happiness, love, death and on how we value life changes over time, with the help of more than a hundred people of different ages, starting from 0 to 100. Although the film accompanies strangers, the narrative structure of an ideal linear chronology makes it possible for any viewer to relate with the key-moments in which these strangers find themselves; in fact, they work as mileposts, marking various life stages and rites of passage. Consistent from a conceptual point of view and provided with equally fluid and fragmentary camerawork and editing, the film also conveys the on-going shift in the way we approach the playfulness of life, social conventions, normative concepts and our own body, while never letting us forget a premise that we generally tend to repress, namely that the process of ageing begins at birth. ...

  • Al Karamah - Human Dignity

    Much has been written and shown about Palestinians and Israelis. Yet, one part has been left out by media, as well as by anthropology, the Palestinian minority in Israel. Over 900,000 Palestin­ian-Arabs live in Israel as citizens of the Jewish State. This film throws light on their situation. The story is told by Samiyeh, a 20 years old Palestinian and her cousin Nidal. Like all young people in the Arab world, which has been bombarded by Western ideals and values, they have their own hopes and frustrations, sweet dreams and nightmares. However, the Is­raeli government intrudes into the minutest details of their lives. The Palestini­ans are prospering in Israel along with the rest of the society. But “money is not everything” as Samiyeh’s father puts it; money comes and goes. But “if al karamah (human dignity) goes, it can never come back”. ...

  • Alethea

    Since of the year of 1989 multinaational mining companies have been coming to Turkey in order to mine gold with the cyanide leaching process. Eurogold, an Australian and Canadian joint venture is one of them. Their mine is situated in Bergama. The people living in Bergama and the 17 villages in the surroundings started to resist the project. The people won all the instances of their legal struggle. However, the mine still operates. The story in the documentary is about the people and their long struggle. We followed their struggle since 1996. ...

  • Alethea

    Since of the year of 1989 multinaational mining companies have been coming to Turkey in order to mine gold with the cyanide leaching process. Eurogold, an Australian and Canadian joint venture is one of them. Their mine is situated in Bergama. The people living in Bergama and the 17 villages in the surroundings started to resist the project. The people won all the instances of their legal struggle. However, the mine still operates. The story in the documentary is about the people and their long struggle. We followed their struggle since 1996. ...

  • Alfred Melotu, the Funeral of a Paramount Chief

    This film is a testament to the life of Alfred Melotu, the Paramount Chief of the Papua speaking people of Fenoaloa, the largest of the Reef Islands, which belong to the Solomon Islands. In 1994, Danish anthropologist Jens Pinholt visited Fenoaloa , and during this visit, he and the Big Men of the Islands discussed future plans for documenting Kastom, the revival of traditional cultural elements among the people. This discussion resulted in a plan to make a film about the life of the Paramount Chief and his constant endeavor to preserve cultural traditions. Melotu's untimely death during the second visit of the film crew in 1996 changed these plans. What was to be an account on the life of a Paramount Chief became a film about his death and funeral. ...

  • Al-Halqa - In the Storyteller's Circle

    'Al-Halqa - In the Storyteller's Circle addresses this fading culture of Morocco's itinerant story-tellers: the public square is the place where the 'Halaiqi' improvise or reinterpret for their circles of onlookers stories which have never been written down before, being orally transmitted from generation to generation. In Marrakech, Abderahim El Maqori tells stories that he has been collecting in his mind and heart since he was a child. As he is growing older, he starts teaching his son Zoheir - who got his name from a story that Abherahim told the day he was born - the tricks of his dying trade. Exquisitely shot, with a great sense for both the revealing close-up and for the atmospheric wide shot, Al-Halqa follows the teaching and learning process and, following on to that, the trip taken by the father and son to Fez, Morocco's intellectual capital, for the ultimate storytelling test in the city square. ...

  • Alisa in Warland

    Alisa was 26 when the revolution started in Kiev. She was a student at a film school at the time, but above all she felt she was a Ukrainian, called to do something for her country. This film describes her journey from Euromaidan to the war in the East. It is a sensitive diary of a young woman lost in a shaky world. Alisa is much more than just a filmmaker, she turns into an active participant in the events, a soldier going as far as becoming ''one of the boys'' in the line of fire. And she is also a young woman in love. This film is the outcome of a candid self-documenting of her adventures. Like Lewis Carroll's Alice, she finds herself in a bizzare distorted world, and tries to ballance the three parts of her personality. ...

  • Aliyah DaDa (aka From Romania to Zion)

    The film presents a well documented history of Jews in Romania. 133 years ago, a small community in Moinești was leaving for the Holy Land, to establish one of the first kibbutzim in Palestine. Since then, the path of Jews towards Israel has been intertwined with the history of modern Romania through a love-hate bond, the influences of which cannot be quantified too soon. The historical tale is visually trimmed in the Dada style as a tribute to the pioneers of this movement, Tristan Tzara and Marcel Janco, two Jews of Romanian descent. ...

  • All About Eve

    What can a woman do when she is desperate to have children, and it just does not happen? Artificial insemination could be an answer. From a medical point of view, artificial insemination it is a relatively simple procedure. Few people realize, though, what an immense pressure it puts on the couple, and especially on the prospective mother. The film is about a woman, who decides that having a baby would be the most important thing in her life. There are repeated unsuccessful attempts. There is hope, despair, and then hope again. The film offers quite an intimate view on the personal drama of the characters, as the couple in question are the director himself and his wife. Shot during an extensive period of time, the film follows all the stages of the medical procedure and its emotional implication. The director goes beyond his personal story to explore the differences between men and women's reactions to fertility treatments. ...

  • All that Glitters

    The small village Olympos on the Karpathos Island in Greece has been almost isolated from the rest of the world until a quarter of a century ago. Since construction of the road that crosses the island from north to south, the locals can travel more easily. At the same time, Olympos has become an accessible place for tourists, who are attracted by the archaic atmosphere. The film observes the impact on traditional life within the "opening to the world." Although preserved in its appearances - after all, tourists come to Olympos to experience the picturesque village life, and, take pictures of the local women wearing traditional costumes with heavy gold coin necklaces - the elders feel tradition is no longer preserved in spirit. Transmigrants, who return to their home village every summer for the great St. Mary Festival, also deplore the recent changes in the village life. For the villagers, tradition has always been a cultural pride, and more recently, a source of income. ...

  • Alo!?

    An isolated village, not far from Bucharest. Most of its young people have left the village for the city. They could not communicate with the families they left behind, so they bought them mobile phones. How did the villagers adapt to this new type of communication? ...

  • Alphabet

    We’re living in times of sweeping changes, crises and disorientation. The financial system, energy, climate change: all the problems in these areas have one thing in common, they were created by humans. Many were created by humans educated at the world’s best universities and institutions. Is this mess a side effect of their education, or the underlying attitudes and approach? The documentary’s focus in on the global modern education system and on the way it represents obstacle for the developing of creativity and free thought in children. It also highlights the fact that, in the future, education should further embrace diversity and variety, thus enriching the students’ universe ...

  • Alphabet of Fear, The

    The Romanian-German poet Herta Müller (1953) was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2009. Müller’s parents were German speaking Romanians. Her father served in the German SS during World War II, and her mother was imprisoned in a Soviet working camp after the war. Her own studies and adult life were overshadowed by the repression of the Ceausescu regime and the continuous harassment of the Securitate. The fears and traumas resulting from those experiences largely continue to dominate her life. When Herta Müller is not working on a novel, she composes so-called ‘collage poems’. The bewilderment and fear that characterize her prose also pervade her poetry. The Alphabet of Fear is a quest for the roots of her work, the mortal fear and the thirst for life that pervade all her writings. It is a film about living in fear, with literature as a sole weapon. ...

  • Always in Motion

    The film follows a group of Freerunners from Austria on a trip through Croatia, Italy and Austria. It shows them in cities like Venice, where they practice their art of movement: Freerunning/Parkour. The film tries to understand this form of alternative movement and the people who practice it. It tries to reveal the motivations, the values, the concepts and the relationships of the practitioners. ...

  • Always Together

    Is there a recipe for an ideal family? 25 years ago, Petr used to be an urban man studying computer science. Then he met Simona, and they decided to pursue their dream of freedom together. Choosing a traditional lifestyle of self-sufficiency, love and togetherness, the couple lead a frugal, bohemian life in a self-made house in a meadow in the Bohemian Forest, with the bare essentials – and their nine children. Can fatherly love become suffocating for the children? Rejecting a conventional life style means sacrifices for the whole family. Will they be able to fit in modern society? ...

  • Alyosha

    Monuments serve the purpose to estabilish memory and create identity. Most monuments erected during the Soviet regime were taken away after Estonia regained its independence in 1991. The Bronze Soldier "Alyosha", located in the centre of Tallinn, remaind in its place. For Estonian nationalists this monument was the symbol for Soviet occupation and marked the beginning of Stalinist repressions. However, for many Russians the monument was one of the few remaining symbols that connected them to Russia and Russian identity. Documentary Alyosha brings us the people who gathered to the Bronze Soldier and whose bahaviour created a new line in our cultural memory. What mattered were the rituals around the monument, not the monument itself. Differences of opinion about history resulted in tragic conflicts and relocating the monument. ...

  • Am I Lucky?

    Would you have been lucky if your parents, if they wished to punish you, would have forbidden you to go to school? Would you have been lucky if you had to marry at 13 years? The questions are asked by two young men, a Romanian and a Roma, turned into reporters, during their ten-day- long journey through several different Roma communities from Romania. Every stop reaches a new question: in Seaca, few remember the slaves who founded the village, in Fetesti the topic is made by the orphans returned after the deportation in Transnistria, and in Brateiu, Sibiu county, the Roma make kettles which they sell in museums and fairs, and their children already have dowry and marry on the parents’ command and only wear traditional clothing. In Dumbraveni, the Roma go to the school for children with special needs if they repeat the class for three years, while students on the special places from the student dormitories in Bucharest tell their success stories. A voyage about ignorance and stereotypes on music by Shukar Collective. ...

  • Amazing Astronomers of Antiquity

    Over 2,000 years ago ancient astronomers knew the Earth was round; they measured its diameter and distance from the Sun; knew the length of the year to the precision of our modern calendar; and developed a method for predicting eclipses. Ancient sailors navigated by the stars and some astronomers even suspected the Earth orbited the Sun. Amazing Astronomers of Antiquity is a journey of learning from the Pantheon to the ancient Library of Alexandria to the pyramids of Egypt. Discover why the Pantheon is an astronomical instrument; how Eratosthenes measured the Earth's circumference; how the Saqqara Step Pyramid depicts the turning stars; who first claimed that the Earth orbits the Sun; and who created the Antikythera Mechanism with hundreds of gears to predict motions of the Sun, Moon and planets. ...

  • Ambassadors

    The film explores the life of modern nomads: the diplomats, a tribe sharing common rituals, beliefs and even a common language. Following the routine of the Ambassador of Finland in New Delhi, the filmmaker reveals a glimpse of the diplomats and their families, which is unknown to the public. Beyond the glamorous parties and the official meetings, there is plenty of hard work, and worries. Encountering a new world and culture is also an issue, especially for the ambassador's children. Conflicts between India and Pakistan, merely news items for most of us, directly affect the every day life of this family. After years of anthropological field research with nomads in Siberia, in Tuva and in India, Jouko Aaltonen turns his camera towards Western "nomads" who are exposed to non-Western cultures. "For me" declares the filmmaker "it is a film about facing another culture. And about nomadism. After all, aren't we all a little bit nomad?" ...

  • American Commune

    Rena and Nadine were raised in a hippie commune from Tennessee and left in 1985. They are revisiting it now for the first time, to explore the commune’s and their own familiy’s history. After many years of hiding their past, they try to understand how did the biggest American utopian socialist experiment work, as they were part of it, too. ...

  • American Gipsy: A Stranger In Everybody’s Land

    There are one million Gypsies in America, who most people know nothing about. They continue to live according to traditions that remain mysterious to outsiders. This is at least in part because a central aspect of Gypsy culture is the limiting of contact with non-Gypsies. The film tells the story of one Romani family in the American Northwest that has defied the wall of silence surrounding their people. Jimmy Marks, a flamboyant community leader, and his family struggle to regain reputation and property after a racially motivated police raid in their Spokane, Washington home. "American Gypsy" unravels the history and culture of the Roma and the prejudices about their way of life that have arisen over the centuries. ...

  • Amji-Kin: The Run of the World

    Log-races for men and women are an almost daily sport activity for the Canela, strongly conected with their mythology and ritual life. The film introduces Canela culture and then focuses on ritual and running events, explaining Canela ideas of "The Run of the World". ...

  • Among the Believers

    With unprecedented access to the inner workings of ideological myopia, “Among the Believers” follows clerical leaders, social activists and students of the numerous extremist Islamic schools in order to paint a nuanced picture of the context, motivations and perpetuation of violence and radicalization in Pakistan. Archive newsreel and present-day footage mix in a non-linear fashion to trace the origins of a seemingly incomprehensible situation. A self-interested political class, repeated failures of the government and poverty inevitably pushes people into a context where their minds get warped. In this void of power, none of the leaders can or want to be saviours, leaving the people vulnerable to fanatical beliefs. However, “Among the Believers” doesn’t look for Bogeymen, but looks at people without trying to redeem them, observing how they acting out of their personal traumas in a vicious cycle of oppression and force. ...

  • An Awesome Film

    In a country poisoned by worthless policies, by corruption, poverty and deforestation, Alin - a heroic character - creates a country of his own. A "country within a country", governed by common sense and led by volunteers who dedicate themselves to making the world a better place through culture and education. The film, symbolizing "an act of cultural volunteering", follows the activity of the volunteers from Tăşuleasa Social during one year, in their attempt to change the mentalities and propose new solutions for a better future. ...

  • An Only Voice

    The film describes the situation of the indians in the Northern region of Argentina. They struggle to get the restitution of their land, to complement their culture. It was for the first time thet they accepted the “blancs” to film their discussion. ...

  • Anatomy of a Departure

    The director recreates the journey of his family who left Romania at the end of the '80s and are now looking back, after 20 years at the memories of the country they left behind. On the one side, we see the dark viewpoint of the parents about a country persecuted by an oppressive system and transformed into a confined space. On the other side, we discover the romantic vision of the son, of a heavenly space, marked by teenage friendships and a forever lost family happiness. ...

  • And the roof is called "Home"

    The Maramureş village is the eye of the sky for those who guard the mystery of the warm and perfumed wood which lasts a life-time. Its shadow is the everlasting nature of the church. ...

  • And Then, Who Are We?

    Three and a half million Jews used to live in Poland before 1939. 350,000 of them survived the Holocaust. How many Jews are living in Poland today? Nobody knows for sure. Directed as a personal journey, the film attempts to discover the life of Poland's so-called "new Jews", sixty years after the Holocaust and fifteen years after the fall of communism. Since 2001, when the Polish President officially acknowledged the pogroms thus taking the first step towards reconciliation, the Jewish community has tried to renew Jewish life. What does this renewal mean for the few thousands - or maybe even less - Polish Jews? The film looks for answers to these questions and reveals what it means to be a Jew in today's Poland. ...

  • And We Shall Soon Reach Heaven

    The film approaches questions of religious and ethnic identity through the subject of the motorcycle taxi riders of Calabar, Nigeria. The far from mundane experience of a taxi ride provides a focus around which daily encounters with danger, risk-taking and the search for spiritual “protection” can be explored. ...

  • Andre and Nandi

    Hungarian-born Andre Reinitz only discovered his Jewish heritage when he moved to Brussels at the age of ten. Since then, in spite of the silence of his parents, he has become involved in the Jewish community as a Klezmer musician. This film follows Andre, torn between Brussels and Budapest, as he tries to learn more about his cultural and familial roots. ...

  • Andrew With Great Fanfare

    Andrew is 14 years old and lives at his grandmother's in a poor neighborhood of New Orleans. His strict father is a major in the US army and is constantly on the road. His mother lives with her new boyfriend in Atlanta and he sees her very rarely. Music is Andrew's life and his brass band 'Roots of Music' are his refuge. In his band Andrew learns much more than making music. He learns about values and norms, knowledge that will guide him in his later life. But most of all, the band keeps him off the street. Andrew wants to become a musician and perform in the many amazing jazz clubs of New Orleans. But first, he needs to prepare for the world renowned Mardi Gras parade. ...

  • Angela

    Angela is a 17-year old Roma girl, married and about to give birth to twins. She lives with her parents in a village from Transylvania and spends her day sending letters to her husband, as they’re temporarily separated. Mixing talking heads with everyday family scenes, Botond Püsök’s film speaks about how Angela’s story reflects wider issues, dealing with the need for social integration and with discrimination, while X-raying the difficulties that young girls from the community have to face: the lack of education, gender inequality and the persistency of controversial customs such as kidnapping girls that are to be married. Young Angela is stoically trying to cope with all these problems, by counterbalancing them with faith and optimism. Angela is a 17-year old Roma girl, married and about to give birth to twins. She lives with her parents in a village from Transylvania and spends her day sending letters to her husband, as they’re temporarily separated. Mixing talking heads with everyday family scenes, Botond Püsök’s film speaks about how Angela’s story reflects wider issues, dealing with the need for social integration and with discrimination, while X-raying the difficulties that young girls from the community have to face: the lack of education, gender inequality and the persistency of controversial customs such as kidnapping girls that are to be married. Young Angela is stoically trying to cope with all these problems, by counterbalancing them with faith and optimism. ...

  • Anthill

    Wails of a violin echo through an immense concrete building, as a man wistfully listens while another falls from his feet, almost-empty vodka bottle rattling on the pavement. Frames masterfully drenched in darkness and succinct strokes of light alternate with more naturalistic compositions to portray a somewhere in Tallinn, where a small part of the Soviet Union lives on. “Anthill” is a direct cinema documentary that observes a small group of people whose lives gravitate around an unspectacular garage complex. Although lacking any apparent appeal, the building proves to be the veritable vault, safekeeping all of the characters’ possessions, ideals and obsessions. Carefully constructed compositions alternate with moments of candid humdrum, capturing life’s involuntary absurd juxtapositions but also graceful moments of the ordinary. ...

  • Șantier în lucru-The Cities, after

    The documentary offers a balanced perspective on the urban development of Romanian cities after the fall of communism in 1989. The authors selected three emblematic cities, Cluj Napoca, Constanța and Iași for this first-time project. They study the inner workings of the anarchist understanding of democracy and its impact on the ecological, social and urban equilibrium, as well as the post-communist generation’s new ways of city –making. ...

  • Anton Pann - Dealer in Words

    A film reconstructing the moment of transformation from an oral folk-culture, from the folklore of the city and slums to cultivated literature inspired by such folklore. It is about the passage from the old period to the new which new meet in a unique, fascinating character, Anton Pann. His life and work emanate a special atmosphere - that of Bucharest at that time. ...

  • Anything But Black

    ''You're born and you will die" confidently declares an eighty year old woman trying on the outfit she has prepared for her future death. Still widely practiced amongst the elderly population in rural Lithuania, the ancient custom of preparing your own burial clothes seems much less acceptable to the younger generation. „Anything But Black" explores this unique tradition through encounters with those who still maintain it - proudly showing off the dresses as their sacred possession; those who express their disapproval and also those to whom this practice is completely unheard of. The film proposes a rather unconventional attitude towards death - that of acceptance. From this perspective, death is less sinister, and can get even humorous. ...

  • Apocalypse By Cioran, The

    "Universal history is nothing more than a chain of recurring catastrophes waiting for the final catastrophe."(E. Cioran) The film brings the viewer to Cioran's home in Paris, walks along with him to his favorite places, and records his recollections of a "lost Paradise", his place of birth in a village near Sibiu, where he never returned. We meet Cioran the philosopher and Cioran the man, profound and explosively humorous, shortly before his departure from this world. The film is narrated by the Romanian philosopher Gabriel Liiceanu. ...

  • Apocalypse By Cioran, The

    "Universal history is nothing more than a chain of recurring catastrophes waiting for the final catastrophe."(E. Cioran) The film brings the viewer to Cioran's home in Paris, walks along with him to his favorite places, and records his recollections of a "lost Paradise", his place of birth in a village near Sibiu, where he never returned. We meet Cioran the philosopher and Cioran the man, profound and explosively humorous, shortly before his departure from this world. The film is narrated by the Romanian philosopher Gabriel Liiceanu. ...

  • Apocalypse On Wheels

    This is not a film about the how the roads or the cars look like, but about what the traffic turns us into. I chose 5 different people whom I accompanied all over town, in their every day journeys. For 5 months, I have been with them in their car, sitting on the right seat and lidtening to them. They are all ordinary people: - a delivery boy who has been driving about 14 hours a day around the capital; - a half paralyzed man who not only drives a car, but he also helps other people to avail themselves of cars; - a Peru born eoman, who was raised in a city with an equally crazed traffic; - a father who has recently lost his daughter in a traffic accident; - a policeman who, before December '89, was beaten up by militia. ...

  • Apocalypse: World War I: DELIVERANCE

    October 1917: the Italians are defeated in a bloody battle against Austro-Hungary and Germany. At the same time, Lenin leads the Bolsheviks and initiates the October Revolution. In March 1918, the new communist Russian leaders sign a peace treaty with the Central Forces at Brest-Litovsk. The Germans would then send their troops towards France, on the Western front. The frightened Parisians leave the capital, but American reinforcements are on their way. In July 1918, 1.300.000 Americans are on European ground. Uncle Sam wins battle after battle and all French territories are liberated, while the British are winning in the East, recovering land from the surrendering Turks. On 11 November 1918, the fighting stops. The Treaty of Versailles sows the seeds for the Second World War. ...

  • Apocalypse: World War I: FEAR

    While the Russians are advancing on Prussian territory, in the West the German offensive is barely stopped by the French during the battle of the Marne. The Western front is established and it extends from Switzerland to the shore of the North Sea. In the South, the Italians and the Turks also join the conflict. Subsequently, the British and French allies appeal to their Empires: Canadians, Australians, New Zealanders, Senegalese, Moroccans, Algerians, Annamese enter the war. The fire has already extended to the whole world. The battlefields are a living hell. ...

  • Apocalypse: World War I: FURY

    The war that took place between 1914 and 1918 was an immense carnage, yielding almost 10 million dead soldiers, 9 million dead civilians and 21 million wounded. What is the source of this fury which would engulf the world for four years? A few weeks after the Sarajevo assassination of Franz Ferdinand, Austria-Hungary declares war on Serbia, complying with the alliances formed between the states. In August 1914, the Germans are drawing near to Paris. ...

  • Apocalypse: World War I: HELL

    September 1915. Millions of men are trapped in a tremendous war. From the trenches of France, to the mountains of Italy or the Balkans, up to the Oriental Gates, the whole of Europe is under flames. With new weapons and new defensive techniques, the war turns into an industrial and chemical conflict. The battles reach an unimaginable level of violence. The artillery besieges: attacks are conducted using gas, rocket launchers, shrapnel, a mixture of lead powder and lead balls which tear up faces and bodies. The assaults are terrifying, even suicidal. Steel storms pierce the eardrum and drive the soldiers mad. The wounds are terrible, living and hygiene conditions are disastrous, epidemics wreak havoc... It's hell on earth. ...

  • Apocalypse: World War I: RAGE

    Rage is brewing, starvation is crushing the population, leading to uprisings. In Germany, socialist movements challenge the future of the Reich. The Austro-Hungarian Empire is shaking. Franz-Joseph is dead and Charles, his successor, is attempting to bring peace. The battle at Chemin des Dames triggers riots, the Tsar abdicates, while the Russian soldiers join the revolution. However, the Germans make a strategic mistake which would change the course of events: they decide to attack all ships on the Atlantic, including the American ones. The USA joins the allies and, in June 1917, general Pershing lands in France with the first troops. A month after their arrival, the Passchendaele battle starts in Belgium. Another senseless carnage. Aren't the leaders longing for deliverance? ...

  • Applause Man

    Antoon De Pauw had his fifteen minutes of fame during the ‘90’s. He was known for his numerous attempts to steal applause on public occasions. No stage, show or event was spared from Antoon’s streakings: fully dressed-up in tuxedo, he jumped on scene to receive the applause from the audience. The purpose of these appearances has always remained a mystery. Was it rebellion against the growing mass media? Or was it a cry for attention? Some said he was just mad, crazy. What started out as something innocent had become a life-changing obsession for Antoon. Addicted to the rush and trapped in a controversial media storm, he completely lost it. His sudden death in 2009, left a lot of questions unanswered. The Applause Man shines a new light on the life and story of this forgotten cult-celebrity. The Applause Man is a film about a man devoted to applause, and how far he went for his passion. ...

  • ARIA

    The impetuous artistic nature and innate theatrical sensibility, combined with intelligence and a stunning voice, have made opera singer and actress Maria Cebotari into one of Europe's brightest artistic presences at the beginning of the 20th century. Conceived as a documentary and musically-structured as an opera performance, Aria can surprisingly be perceived as a fictional narrative, causing uncommon emotions and aesthetic experiences. Maria Cebotari's artistic destiny is uniquely expressed in this dramatic and purifying cinema performance. ...

  • Armânii, at the famous Manakia to I'm not famous...

    The documentary provides a voyage into the world of the Aromanians (Armâni), from the first motion pictures ever filmed in the Balkans, which, incidentally, were shot by the Aromanian Brothers Yanaki and Milton Manakia and to the first talkie in the history of cinema spoken in Aromanian. Its title, “I’m not famous but I’m Armân”, is emblematic for this proud and mysterious people. A special attention is given to the connection the viewers themselves are prompted to make between the films shot by the Manakia Brothers after 1905, presenting moments from daily life and the past of the Armâns, and the film “I’m not famous but I’m Armân” , made more than a hundred years later, which presents, as part of the story, the current situation of the Armân people. The conclusion is that, irrespective of where they live, the Armâns share the same name and language and are the same people. ...

  • Art of The Dictatorship , The Dictators of Art

    The author makes his documentary round the idea of the influence of the dictatorship on plastic, film, literary and architectural arts.For his commentary he used the words of some well-known figures in these fields. ...

  • Art War

    Art becomes an important weapon for young Egyptians who are continuing the revolution on the streets of Cairo. They bring art into the streets to create commemorative images of the victims of the violent clashes between the police and the protesters, they stage bold performances or compose music that goes against the coercive values of Islamic extremists. More than one thousand artists have died since the beginning of the revolution in Egypt and others are threatened to be killed by Islamic leaders. Nevertheless, for many of them cultural resistance through art is a way of life and an alternative to the political and religious system in Egypt. A bold documentary that will keep you on the edge of your seat. ...

  • As Far As Makó From Jerusalim: We Came Back

    WE CAME BACK, the last part of the series of AS FAR AS MAKÓ FROM JERUSALIM, shows a meeting of orthodox Jews from all parts of the World in Makó to commemorate at their -or their parents- native town the 50th anniversary 1994 of the Holocaust and the death of the last Rabbi of Makó. This is not only an opportunity to meet old friends and exchange memories of the past. It also shows that Jewish life and tradition almost ceased to exist in Makó. how little has remained can be seen from the visit of the Jewish cemetery, the synagogue, which will be restored with financial support of the visitors, and the former house of the Rabbi. ...

  • As You Like It

    The documentary brings together several stories of people who choose photographs of themselves for their tombstones. Some of them opt for photos from their young age, but others are rather fussy and undecided, being very concerned about the way in which their picture will be perceived and criticized by the generations to come. Created under the form of a photo album, the film also points out that a cemetery can also be a living record of society. ...

  • Assent

    When the military took control of Chile in the coup of September 1973, it was the culmination of Cold War tensions, international political influence and internal conflict. For the personnel of the Army, it was an event that changed the direction of their lives. ''The Caravan of Death'' that travelled the country by helicopter conducting executions of military detainees in the immediate aftermath of the coup was a mechanism of terror. Thirty years later, the repercussions of those events still play out daily – in courts, in politics, and in the homes of Chilean people. This autobiographical immersive documentary puts the user in the footsteps of media artist Oscar Raby’s father, who in 1973 was a 22-year-old army officer stationed in the north of Chile, on the day when the Caravan of Death came to his regiment. Together with him, the viewer will witness in VR an execution of a group of prisoners captured by the military regime – an army that Raby’s father was himself a part of. ...

  • At Berkeley

    The University of California at Berkeley, the oldest and most prestigious member of a ten campus public education system, is also one of the finest research and teaching facilities in the world. The film, AT BERKELEY, shows the major aspects of university life, its intellectual and social mission, its obligation to the state and to larger ideas of higher education, as well as illustrates how decisions are made and implemented by the administration in collaboration with its various constituencies. ...

  • At Home Anywhere

    Documentary about the lives of a Frisian family of skippers struggling with modernity. Their daily lives are lonely and they seldom meet, loading and unloading cargo in different places. But they still celebrate the old traditions: every summer they meet and compete in their ancestor's ships during 'skutsjesilen', a famous sailing competition in the Dutch province of Friesland. ...

  • At The Feet Of Castle Régéc

    This student film is an attempt to document the villagers' mental images and beliefs regarding an 18th century castle near the small village of Regéc in Northern Hungary. In the summer of 1999, a team of seven students from the Cultural and Visual Anthropology Department of Miskolc University embarked on a complex four year culture research project to excavate the castle. During that excavation, the usually insular, slightly suspicious locals started telling the stories of their grandparents and great-grandparents. This film records in moving pictures the sayings connected to their castle and the fairytale-like stories that occupy such an important place in the cultural memory of the people of Regéc. ...

  • Auction House: A Tale of Two Brothers

    In Calcutta, Anwer and Arshad are struggling to keep their family business afloat. Russel Exchange is the oldest auction house in India. However, the age of the internet and rapid modernization brings in a new challenge for the business of the two brothers. Anwer returns to London with progressive ideas, determined to make the enterprise work. On the other hand, Arshad has his own way of doing business and is reluctant to accept his brother's ideas. In the end, the film tells the story of their adjustment to the new demands on the market, but also of the brothers' adaptation to each other. ...

  • Auctioned Souls

    Antiquity shops in Bucharest are saturated with objects of art. You can find anything there, from paintings, clocks of Chinato pieces of jewlery. These places have an aesthetics of their own. Who brings in all these objects for sale and who buys them? In a changing society, there are parallel worlds living simultaneously. Some are dying out, others are just emerging. The film observes the transfer of objects of art from one world to another. ...

  • Aurora: Lights of Wonder

    Filmed on location in Yellowknife, Canada, this is a documentary that presents the viewers with the unique chance to experience the Aurora Borealis as if they were there, thanks to the pioneering work of astrophotographer Kwon O Chul. The film does not feature the typical time-lapse images, but instead: highresolution, hemispherical video recorded in real-time with a special low-light camera system that captures the subtle detail, colours, dynamism and beauty of the Aurora. In addition, scientific explanations and beautiful art work about the legend of the Aurora are featured throughout the movie. ...

  • Australia

    How do seven young men, former street children in Romanian get to see the Pacific? On December 1st, 2008, a national team from Romania participates for the first time in the Homeless World Cup, in Melbourne, Australia. The film focuses on the members of the team, from selection to the end of the championship. The young men come from Timisoara and Arad, ran away from home and living now in derelict houses, or working and paying rent after having passed through orphanages or prisons. After being defeated by many teams, the young Romanians manage to beat the USA team. They are happy. They are all considering staying and never returning “home”. It is well here, nice weather and people are kind. “In case I never return, a kiss for you all”, cautiously says one of them. But after having photos taken of them on the beach with pretty girls next to them and the ocean behind, the seven return to Romanian to go on with their lives. ...

  • Autumn on Ob River

    Near the Ob River mouth in northwest Siberia, the Khanty are struggling to make a living. The arctic climate is harsh. Their economic situation is unpredictable, due to the confusion of the post-Soviet era. The salaries are low, and payments are often delayed for months. Under such circumstances, the fishing brigade turns to the traditional arctic occupations: hunting and reindeer herding. The film follows the autumnal activities of a Khanty fisherman family. After the main fishing season ends, they move to the winter settlement, where they hunt and tend reindeer. The film tells the story of a Khanty family, who must balance between their work with the fishing brigade and their indigenous occupations in order to survive. ...

  • Awara soup

    The Awara Soup is a kind of stew containing all sorts of ingredients coming from the different cultures of Guyanese society. If you eat that dish on Easter, you are sure never to leave Guyana, they say. Using the cooking of this dish as a starting point, the film explores the different realities composing this French overseas region. American Indians, Europeans, Slave descendents, Laotians, Chinese, Brazilians, Surinamese, tell us how they’re bringing new flavours to the Guyanese stew of identities. ...

  • Awareness

    Filmed in South India at Rishi Valley School, founded by the 20th Century Indian thinker Krishnamurti, "Awareness" explores the sensibilities of two groups of young Indian teen-agers - a group of girls in their dormitory, and a group of boys in theirs - as they live out their daily experiences at the school. The two groups were filmed separately by David and Judith MacDougall over a period of several months' stay at the school. The film highlights gender differences at this critical stage of adolescence and demonstrates how Krishnamurti's encouragement of individuals' awareness and sensitivity to their surroundings is played out at the school. The film provides an insight into education at one of the leading progressive schools of the Indian Subcontinent. ...